Author Archives: Lisa Reed

Invasive Tick in NJ

This month we feature another invasive species, the three-host tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. A multigenerational infestation of this species was detected in Hunterdon Co. last summer by Tadhgh Rainey (a Rutgers Entomology graduate student!) and IDed using a DNA based approach by Andrea Egizi, also a Rutgers graduate. Some common – and possibly misleading – names are “bush tick” and “long-horned tick”. In New Zealand and parts of Australia, where it was introduced over 100 years ago presumably from Japan, it is called the “New Zealand cattle tick” as it is the only tick feeding on cattle. Originally from northeast Asia (China, Korea, SE Russia, Japan), this tick is commonly found on cattle, sheep, deer and medium-sized mammals. And because it feeds very successfully on large, domestic animals, it is potentially a very big problem for the livestock industry. The other problem is that some populations of this tick are parthenogenetic, which means males are not necessary. Parthenogenesis allows infestations to quickly reach very large numbers – so much so that in certain settings, host animals are weakened by the blood loss. The extent of infestation in NJ/US is still not known. Multiple agencies are currently addressing this issue and we should no more by spring. In this image, there are two females (left and middle) and a nymph on the right (scale in mm). For more information see:https://fonseca-lab.com/research/global-health-the-tick-that-binds-us-all/

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Invasive Tick in NJ

This month we feature another invasive species, the three-host tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. A multigenerational infestation of this species was detected in Hunterdon Co. last summer by Tadhgh Rainey (a Rutgers Entomology graduate student!) and IDed using a DNA based approach by Andrea Egizi, also a Rutgers graduate. Some common – and possibly misleading – names are “bush tick” and “long-horned tick”. In New Zealand and parts of Australia, where it was introduced over 100 years ago presumably from Japan, it is called the “New Zealand cattle tick” as it is the only tick feeding on cattle. Originally from northeast Asia (China, Korea, SE Russia, Japan), this tick is commonly found on cattle, sheep, deer and medium-sized mammals. And because it feeds very successfully on large, domestic animals, it is potentially a very big problem for the livestock industry. The other problem is that some populations of this tick are parthenogenetic, which means males are not necessary. Parthenogenesis allows infestations to quickly reach very large numbers – so much so that in certain settings, host animals are weakened by the blood loss. The extent of infestation in NJ/US is still not known. Multiple agencies are currently addressing this issue and we should no more by spring. In this image, there are two females (left and middle) and a nymph on the right (scale in mm). For more information see:https://fonseca-lab.com/research/global-health-the-tick-that-binds-us-all/

Will Climate Change Affect Public Health? YES!

In this video brought to you by the New Jersey Climate Adaption Alliance, the increasing variability in climate brings along with it factors that affect human health, including potential changes in arboviral diseases:

http://njadapt.rutgers.edu/resources/videos/climate-change-and-public-health-implications-for-new-jersey

For more information, see the NJ CLimate Adaptation Alliance website. They have lots of informative video!

Fonseca lab webpage for discovery

Dina Fonseca has launched her lab’s new webpage at https://fonseca-lab.com/  . Here you can get the latest information on what the lab is involved in, including global climate change impacts on disease epidemiology. Publications, research project, outreach and the people involved can all be found there. Keep coming back as the website, like the projects, evolve!

Thanks to Daniela Correia for getting the site up and running! She is the CVB’s multitasking secretary.

Does it matter if the county next to you does vector control? YES!

ABSTRACT: Vector-borne disease transmission is often typified by highly focal transmission and influenced by movement of hosts and vectors across different scales. The ecological and environmental conditions (including those created by humans through vector control programmes) that result in metapopulation dynamics remain poorly understood. The development of control strategies that would most effectively limit outbreaks given such dynamics is particularly urgent given the recent epidemics of dengue, chikungunya and Zika viruses. We developed a stochastic, spatial model of vectorborne disease transmission, allowing for movement of hosts between patches. Our model is applicable to arbovirus transmission by Aedes aegypti in urban settings and was parametrized to capture Zika virus transmission in particular. Using simulations, we investigated the extent to which two aspects of vector control strategies are affected by human commuting patterns: the extent of coordination and cooperation between neighbouring communities. We find that transmission intensity is highest at intermediate levels of host movement. The extent to which coordination of control activities among neighbouring patches decreases the prevalence of infection is affected by both how frequently humans commute and the proportion of neighbouring patches that commits to vector surveillance and control activities. At high levels of host movement, patches that do not contribute to vector control may act as sources of infection in the landscape, yet have comparable levels of prevalence as patches that do cooperate. This result suggests that real cooperation among neighbours will be critical to the development of effective pro-active strategies for vector-borne disease control in today’s commuter-linked communities.

Read the full article: Stone CM, Schwab SR, Fonseca DM and Fefferman NH 2017 Human movement, cooperation and the effectiveness of coordinated vector control strategies. J. R. Soc. Interface 14: 20170336. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2017.0336c

Pesticide Recertification Course coming in October!

Course Description: This course meets pesticide applicators in need of credits before their pesticide applicator license expires in October. The training has been tailored for government employees with immediate concerns and responsibilities for stewardship of public health, mosquito research, surveillance and control. All who need re-certification credits in the above categories are welcome to sign up.

Topics for this one day course include:

9:45 AM – Registration & Coffee
10:00 Bionomics of Rare Mosquitoes Found in New Jersey
Scott Crans, Office of Mosquito Control Coordination
10:30 Pesticide Update for 2017
Dr. George Hamilton, Rutgers Department of Entomology
11:00 From Aerial Spraying to Beekeeping Practices, What are The Effects of Mosquito Abatement on Honeybees?
Dr. Diana Carle, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
11:30 Lunch Break- Light Lunch Provided
12:30 Advances in Vector Control Science: Rear-and-Release Strategies Show Promise… but Don’t Forget the Basics
Dr. Brian Johnson, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
1:00 Amplification and Transmission Cycles: Turn Up the Volume!
Dr. Lisa Reed, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
1:30 Demonstration and Research: Mosquito Insecticide Resistance Management
Dr. Dina Fonseca, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology

Come join the fun! For more information and to sign up, click here.

Upcoming Webinars

The Northeastern Integrated Pest Management at Cornell will be hosting three webinars in September 2017 that could be of interest to people following arboviruses, disease, vectors, pests and/or control. Their webinar series, called “The IPM Toolbox” will include:

  1. 11 September 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Laura Harrington will talk about the erstablishment of the Northeast Regional Center for Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases.
  2. 13 September 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Scott Isard will talk about iPIPE or the integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education.
  3. 25 September 11:00 – 12:00 A Team of people, including Rick Cooper and George Hamilton, will discuss the Brown Maromorated Stink Bug and control.

For more information, see http://www.northeastipm.org/ipm-in-action/the-ipm-toolbox/