Category Archives: Uncategorized

Will Climate Change Affect Public Health? YES!

In this video brought to you by the New Jersey Climate Adaption Alliance, the increasing variability in climate brings along with it factors that affect human health, including potential changes in arboviral diseases:

http://njadapt.rutgers.edu/resources/videos/climate-change-and-public-health-implications-for-new-jersey

For more information, see the NJ CLimate Adaptation Alliance website. They have lots of informative video!

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Fonseca lab webpage for discovery

Dina Fonseca has launched her lab’s new webpage at https://fonseca-lab.com/  . Here you can get the latest information on what the lab is involved in, including global climate change impacts on disease epidemiology. Publications, research project, outreach and the people involved can all be found there. Keep coming back as the website, like the projects, evolve!

Thanks to Daniela Correia for getting the site up and running! She is the CVB’s multitasking secretary.

Pesticide Recertification Course coming in October!

Course Description: This course meets pesticide applicators in need of credits before their pesticide applicator license expires in October. The training has been tailored for government employees with immediate concerns and responsibilities for stewardship of public health, mosquito research, surveillance and control. All who need re-certification credits in the above categories are welcome to sign up.

Topics for this one day course include:

9:45 AM – Registration & Coffee
10:00 Bionomics of Rare Mosquitoes Found in New Jersey
Scott Crans, Office of Mosquito Control Coordination
10:30 Pesticide Update for 2017
Dr. George Hamilton, Rutgers Department of Entomology
11:00 From Aerial Spraying to Beekeeping Practices, What are The Effects of Mosquito Abatement on Honeybees?
Dr. Diana Carle, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
11:30 Lunch Break- Light Lunch Provided
12:30 Advances in Vector Control Science: Rear-and-Release Strategies Show Promise… but Don’t Forget the Basics
Dr. Brian Johnson, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
1:00 Amplification and Transmission Cycles: Turn Up the Volume!
Dr. Lisa Reed, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology
1:30 Demonstration and Research: Mosquito Insecticide Resistance Management
Dr. Dina Fonseca, Rutgers Department of Entomology, Center for Vector Biology

Come join the fun! For more information and to sign up, click here.

Upcoming Webinars

The Northeastern Integrated Pest Management at Cornell will be hosting three webinars in September 2017 that could be of interest to people following arboviruses, disease, vectors, pests and/or control. Their webinar series, called “The IPM Toolbox” will include:

  1. 11 September 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Laura Harrington will talk about the erstablishment of the Northeast Regional Center for Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases.
  2. 13 September 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Scott Isard will talk about iPIPE or the integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education.
  3. 25 September 11:00 – 12:00 A Team of people, including Rick Cooper and George Hamilton, will discuss the Brown Maromorated Stink Bug and control.

For more information, see http://www.northeastipm.org/ipm-in-action/the-ipm-toolbox/

 

Ehrlichiosis may be under-reported in NJ

From the abstract: The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, is a vector of Ehrlichia chaffeensis and E. ewingii, causal agents of human ehrlichiosis, and has demonstrated marked geographic expansion in recent years. A. americanum ticks often outnumber the vector of Lyme disease, Ixodes scapularis, where both ticks are sympatric, yet cases of Lyme disease far exceed ehrlichiosis cases. We quantified the risk for ehrlichiosis relative to Lyme disease by using relative tick encounter frequencies and infection rates for these 2 species in Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA. Our calculations predict >1 ehrlichiosis case for every 2 Lyme disease cases, >2 orders of magnitude higher than current case rates (e.g., 2 ehrlichiosis versus 439 Lyme disease cases in 2014). This result implies ehrlichiosis is grossly underreported (or misreported) or that many infections are asymptomatic. We recommend expansion of tickborne disease education in the Northeast United States to include human health risks posed by A. americanum ticks.

Read more here at EID ! NOTE: There is a Continuing Medical Education (CME) credit available (1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 ) upon participation in activity with this article. See the first page of the article for more information.

Reducing ticks by targeting hosts

Ixodes scapularis, taken by James Occi.

Ixodes scapularis, taken by James Occi. This was a photo used for the cover of of the book, “Lyme Disease: Why it’s spreading, how it makes you sick and what to do about it” by Alan Barbour.

From the Abstract: We describe a 2-yr trial to evaluate the ability of SELECT Tick Control System (TCS) host-targeted bait boxes to reduce numbers of host-seeking Ixodes scapularis nymphs in a residential neighborhood. After four successive 9-wk deployments, nymphal and larval I. scapularis infestation prevalence and intensity were significantly reduced on target small mammals. In addition, these deployments resulted in 87.9% and 97.3% control of hostseeking nymphs in treatment sites at 1 yr and 2 yr postintervention, respectively. Installation of a protective metal cover around the SELECT TCS bait boxes eliminated nontarget wildlife damage to bait boxes that resulted in failure of previous bait box types. The results are discussed in the context of the residential environment and future research needs.

Schulze T, R A Jordan, M Williams and M C Dolan 2017 Evaluation of the SELECT tick control system (TCS), a host-targeted bit box, to reduce exposure to Ixodes sxapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in a Lyme disease endemic area of New Jersey. Journal of Medical Entomology, https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjx044

Recent Developments

Dr. Fonseca will attend a Strategic meeting of the Worldwide Insecticide resistance Network (WIN) that will be held in Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL, from May 04-05, 2017. This meeting is supported by the WHO Research & Training program on Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the Department of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) and the US-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US-CDC).

A proposal entitled “Predicting the evolution of vector-borne disease dynamics in a changing world” by Dr. Fonseca was top rated in the NSF DEB Ecology of Infectious Diseases panel (five “excellent” and one “very-good”) and recommended for funding. Using Next-Generation genomics we will generate one of the first comprehensive datasets detailing the evolutionary potential of the major players in a complex multi-host disease system: avian malaria in endemic Hawaiian birds transmitted by invasive mosquitoes. Our results will help mitigate the anthropogenic impacts associated with invasive species and climate change, and can be translated directly into practical management recommendations. This 4 year $2,498,876 project is slated to start on July 2017.

A grant on”Climate Change, Nuisance Mosquito Populations, and Long-term Resilience of Coastal Salt Marsh Systems” was awarded to the Center for Remote Sensing & Spatial Analysis (CRSSA), the Center for Vector Biology (CVB) and the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve (JCNERR) plus in collaboration with state and county mosquito agencies.